Sage and Jessica’s Magical Christmas Cake

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This is Sage. Sage is an elf who loves sharing stories with children. She is also a little bit cheeky, as you will see when you hear all about how she helped Jessica to bake a Christmas cake today.

It’s never too early to bake a Christmas cake. The fruit cake inside lasts a long time, and Singing Sarah decided that today would be a good day to bake the cake and have it ready in plenty of time for Christmas Day. It would be a job well done.

First of all, Sage and Jessica needed to choose an apron to wear so their clothes wouldn’t get messy while they cooked. There were lots to choose from:

Which one would be a good apron for Sage to wear? Which one do you think Jessica chose?

Now it was time to start cooking. Sage and Jessica looked closely at the recipe card.

“Where are the strawberries? I can’t see any strawberries,” said Sage as she looked at the list of ingredients.

“There aren’t any strawberries in a Christmas cake!” laughed Jessica.

“But strawberries are my favourite thing to eat in the whole world!” wailed Sage, and she pulled a huge strawberry out from the little bag hanging round her neck. The strawberry did look delicious, all rosy, juicy and plump. “I always keep one with me in case I feel hungry!”

“Well, it can’t go in here because it isn’t in the recipe,” Jessica told her firmly.

They set to work. First they added currants, raisins, sultanas and cherries to the mixing bowl and Jessica stirred it round and round.

“Can I add my strawberry now?” asked Sage, hopefully.

“No, Sage!” everyone said.

Jessica sifted the flour and stirred it all again.

“How about now?” asked Sage.

“No, Sage!” everyone said.

In went the eggs and the sugar. Crack crack, splat! Crack crack, splat! went the egg shells as the eggs tumbled into the bowl.

Jessica fed some of the mixture to Sage to see if she thought it was ready. “More?” asked Jessica.

“No, it’s perfect, even if it doesn’t have any strawberries in it,” mumbled Sage with her mouth full of creamy fruit cake mix.

They poured the mixture into a cake tin, then popped it into the oven to bake.

Christmas cakes take a very long time to cook so, while they waited, they sang a little rhyme to pass the time.

It’s nearly time for Christmas,

We’re going to bake a cake!

Mix and stir …

Stir and mix …

Then into the oven to bake.

Here’s our cake, all nice and round,

Let’s ice it white and green,

Pop on some decorations …

It’s the loveliest cake I’ve seen!

PING! At last, the cake was ready. Using the oven gloves to protect her hands, Jessica lifted it very carefully out of the oven and onto the table to cool. Singing Sarah helped her to ice it, and then she put some tiny Christmas decorations all over the top.

They stood back to admire their work. It truly was a beautiful cake. But something was missing. What could it be?

“I still think it should have had strawberries in it,” grumbled Sage as she gazed longingly at the cake.

“That’s it! A strawberry! The red will look really Christmassy! Go on, Sage. You can pop your strawberry on the top,” said Jessica with a smile.

And that’s just what Sage did.

And everyone agreed that the strawberry finished it off perfectly. What a lovely Christmas cake.

As told by Jessica and her Daddy, with a little help from Singing Sarah

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About Sarah Stokes

I am a mother of four children, all currently under the age of eight. Before starting my family, I was a primary school teacher and worked in schools all over London and South East England. Since leaving full time teaching to focus on family life, I have tried to ensure that I stay creative, through learning new skills and trying new things. I have completed my Masters degree in Children's Literature earlier this year, with particular research interests in picture book narratives and writing stories for children. I have recently taken up writing book reviews for the online magazine, IBBYlink, and have a couple of articles due for publication in 2011/12, relating to the world of British 21st century children's literature.

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